Twissic Watches REVIEW

By Nathan Flowers

It’s Really Thin.

Crazy thin. Ridiculously thin.

And I like it.

I don’t normally search out thin watches. I’m usually happy to wear a bigass Seiko diver or even my old G-Shock Mudman when I’m outdoors. But I like this watch a lot. Newcomer Twissic has jumped into the market via their Kickstarter with what may be one of the thinnest watches to make it to market in the past year.

The 316L stainless case is a scant 4.8mm thick at its widest point. The watch itself is relatively thin in diameter, measuring only 38mm, but a large dial and thin bezel make the Twissic ride the wrist like a larger watch. Our loaner units were their Enpointe model, which ride on handsome full-grain leather quick-release straps in an 18mm width.

Everything about the Twissic watches we’ve tested feels minimalistic, but also well-designed. Powered by a Swiss Ronda quartz movement (with a six-year battery life), its hands are small but highly polished and easy to read. The dial comes in an attractive black on the rose gold model, and a clean white on the stainless steel. It’s also water resistant to 3ATM, but you won’t be diving with it. It’s a classier watch, for wearing to work, or out on the town.

I’ve worn them for a solid week, and am most impressed with how lightweight they are. The Twissic seems to just melt into your wrist, and you don’t notice you’re wearing it until you go to take a look at it. I tend to wear my other watches a little loose just to give my wrist space to breathe, but with these, I don’t need to. It sits there waiting, unnoticed until it’s needed, and that’s nice.

Twissic’s Kickstarter page has all the info you’ll need to get your hands on one. You can also check out Styleforum’s Twissic Official Affiliate Thread for more info, or to ask the designers a question about their watches. For the next few days, you can still get in on their £109/$145 super early bird pricing, and to me, it’s a good deal.


This is not a sponsored post. To read Styleforum’s review policy, please click here.

Buying your first suit: a guide

By shawea

Wondering about suits and how to fit them? You’ve come to the right place. First, what is a suit? A suit comprises a jacket and pants in the same fabric. Do not buy a jacket or pants separately and then go looking for a matching piece whose fabric is just “close enough”. A suit is bought as two (or three) pieces together, in exactly the same fabric, from the same bolt. That settled, how to decide between the myriad suits available?

There are four basic areas in which to assess a suit – fabric, construction, fit, and styling. You should consider all these aspects of a suit before deciding on which to buy.

The advice in this article will be geared towards someone buying a small number of suits that he hopes will serve him well in a variety of different settings.

The suit should be made of 100% wool, no elastane, no polyester. Do not be tempted by cotton or linen or cashmere suits. They do have their place in a large wardrobe, but they are not for starter professional wardrobes.

Since you’ll be starting off with suits that you’ll want to wear year-round, get a medium-weight wool (say, somewhere between 9 and 13 oz). Most suits on the market fall in this category so don’t get worried unless the suit seems particularly thin or heavy.

The fabric should be worsted wool, meaning that it is smooth to the touch instead of feeling wooly and hairy like a sweater. An exception to this is woolen flannel, which is acceptable as an alternative to worsted in all but the most formal of office settings. The difficulty is that woolen fabric is quite warm, so if you live somewhere with hot weather, is a less attractive option. But if after 3 medium-weight worsted suits you purchased a woolen as your 4th and a lighter weight suit (with some mohair in it, for instance – mohair makes a suit wear cooler) as a 5th, you’d be better prepared for particularly extreme days and have somewhat more variability in your wardrobe. Avoid fabrics that are above “Super 120s” as they will wear out too quickly. To learn more about different fabrics check out the cloth thread.

As discussed previously, the fabric should be a solid color, at least for your first three suits. Again, you want to be ready for all suit-wearing situations. It helps if each suit goes with as many different shirts and ties as possible. Patterned suits go with fewer shirts and ties than solid suits. And there are virtually no situations in modern life where the more casual patterned suit is appropriate, but a solid suit is not.

buying your first suit guide
A solid worsted flannel is a very versatile choice, at least in cooler climates.

Further Reading: Fabric

The Cloth Thread

How to choose the fabric for your suit

The fabric you see on the outside of a suit jacket is far from the only cloth that is used in its construction. Inside the chest and the lapels are pieces of cloth that give the jacket its structure. What these pieces are and how they are attached to the rest of the jacket is the main differentiator of construction quality between suit jackets.

The guts of a fully canvassed jacket

The guts of a fully canvassed jacket

Guts of a half canvassed jacket​

Guts of a half canvassed jacket

The lowest quality jackets are made with a piece of “fusible” interlining that is glued to the front of the jacket. This results in a stiff chest and roll of the lapel. Fused jackets also may have reduced longevity, although there has been significant improvement in fusing technology in recent decades, such that this may no longer be true. Older fused jackets were infamous for having the interfacing separate from the body fabric after many dry cleanings, with awful and obvious ‘bubbling’ ruining the jacket.

Higher quality jackets are made “half-canvassed”, meaning that the chest piece and lapels are constructed with a canvas interior, which is then sewn to the rest of the jacket. Below the chest, fusible is used, but this is less problematic in the “skirt” (lower part of the jacket) than upper areas. Finally, jackets of the highest quality are fully canvassed, but most of these will be extremely expensive.

Of course there are many other ways in which one jacket can be better made than another, but the divide between fused and half-canvassed is by far the most important one, and is also highly correlated with the others. If your jacket is half-canvassed, you can be sure you’re buying at least a decent quality garment. If your jacket is fused, you can be equally sure it is of shoddy construction.

Construction quality has a loose correlation to price. Many highly priced brands (e.g. all but the highest quality Armani, Hugo Boss) sell fused jackets. Spending even $2,000 is no guarantee of avoiding a fused jacket. So you have to do your own investigation. You can employ the “pinch test” around one of the higher buttonholes to see if you can feel a third piece of fabric floating in between the two sides. Alternatively, you can ask the salesperson. It’s possible they won’t know or won’t even know what you’re asking, in which case you should not listen to anything else they tell you. But the minimally informed salesperson will be able to give you this information.

Commonly recommended brands that offer half-canvas suits at a reasonable price include Suit Supply (~$500), Brooks Brothers 1818 (~$1k retail, but frequent sales). eHaberdasher’s Benjamin line (~$500) offers fully canvassed suits which are very reasonably priced.

Further Reading: Construction

Canvas and Suit Construction

The Styleforum Working Hierarchical Suit Quality List

Suitsupply Design Your Own Program Review

eHaberdasher – Categories

Now we get to the hard part. Everyone’s body is different. Even at a retailer with a wide range of different fit types like Brooks Brothers, there may not be a jacket that fits you particularly well, no matter which size you choose. You may have to try a couple of makers before you find the one that suits you best.

Some of this misfittery can be remedied by any tailor. Almost every suit you buy will need to have the length of the sleeves and the pants changed. These are simple operations. Everyone has their own method for determining the correct sleeve length. The estimable Guido Wongolini suggest that you begin by standing straight with arms at your sides, then lift your hands so that your palms are facing towards the floor, perpendicular to your body. The jacket’s sleeves should then just rest on the back of your hand. This should result in ¼” to ½” of your dress shirt’s sleeve showing. Pants should be hemmed so that they have little or no break, if they have an appropriately tapered leg (a leg opening of no more than say 18” in circumference). The waist of the trouser can usually be taken in or let out by about 2”.

Adjusting the collar is a more complicated procedure. Your suit jacket’s collar should remain affixed to your shirt’s collar behind your neck at all times. Separation between the two is referred to as “gapping”. In a bespoke Savile Row suit, you might be able to play a round of golf without experiencing any gapping. This is harder to achieve with a ready-to-wear garment, but at least see if you can get the jacket not to gap, then walk around the room, sit down, stand up, and see if you’ve got any gapping. If gapping is a problem, a tailor may be able to fix it, but you might be going down a road with no end. Your life will be easier if you buy jackets that have no gapping problems off the rack. To examine the next part of collar fit, you’ll need a mirror or a friend for this one. Look to see if there are horizontal lines on your back, underneath the collar. If so, you’ll need the collar lowered. This is a reasonably simple, low-risk procedure. This could be accomplished by most tailors, but probably not your typical dry cleaner’s/alterations shop. It should cost around $40-50.

The next three points of fit are crucial. If one of them is off, step away from the jacket. No tailor can help you. They are the waist, the shoulders, and the length.

These are the basics of fit, but the topic is nowhere near exhausted. A large fraction of discussions on Styleforum is based around how different garments should fit. These threads should get you started:

The Tailors Thread Fit Feedback and Alteration Suggestions
Official Fit Critique Thread
Get Foofed

Further External Reading: Fit

Most Exerent – Cover Your Ass There is a Common Misconception
How Much Can My Clothes Be Altered

Styling refers to the decorative elements of the jacket that are unrelated to fit. Number of buttons, pockets, breasts, that sort of thing. If you’re starting out buying suits, you’ll want to buy a classically styled suit. Pants can be single-pleated, double-pleated, or flat front, cuffed or uncuffed. Once you get more experience you can decide whether and in what way to deviate from what is below.

The suits that will never elicit any raised eyebrows are two or three-button single-breasted jackets, with two flap pockets, notch lapels, and dual back vents. Generally on SF two button or three-roll-two (meaning the top button is never meant to be buttoned) are preferred, but a “hard three” (roll to the top button, with the top button intended to be used) is perfectly acceptable, especially if you are tall. Lapels are of moderate width, reaching approximately half-way to your shoulders.

A "two-and-a-half" button lapel - it rolls above or through the top button

A “two-and-a-half” button lapel – it rolls above or through the top button

A three-roll-two lapel - the top buttonhole is folded over and the roll goes to the second button

A three-roll-two lapel – the top buttonhole is folded over and the roll goes to the second button

Relatively innocent deviations include the absence of vents, ticket pockets, welted pockets. If you like them, go for it on one or two of your suits. Double-breasted suits and peak lapels on single-breasted suits are dandifications. Hold off on them until you know what you’re doing. A single vent, though acceptable, is an inelegant deviation, as it creates an awkward splitting of the rear of the jacket when you put your hands in your pocket.

Here are some further readings in book form if you would really like to delve into the art of the suit:

The Suit, by Nicholas Antongiovanni
Clothes and The Man, by Alan Flusser


This article is an edited version of an article originally published on Styleforum.net in 2011.

The Difference Between Fused and Full Canvas Suits Explained

by Jefferyd (Jeffery Diduch)

A few years ago I wrote a post about canvas suit construction which some of you may remember. As a continuation of the featured articles on StyleForum I thought I would update and condense some of the information to reflect current trends in manufacturing, and also to bring the information to newer members who may not have seen it.

The illustrations below show where fusible, if any, is applied for the different techniques, as well as where and how canvas is used. In-depth exploration of the various layers hidden beneath the chest felt can be found all over my blog.

First, a word about canvas.

Canvas is typically a blend of wool, often cotton, and animal hair, mainly horse and camel hair. The principal characteristics of the wool and animal hair are that they can be molded using humidity, pressure, and heat, and the fibers will retain a shape; think of how a woman uses a hot curling iron to shape her hair. Horse and camel hair have the additional benefits of being lightweight but very resilient- hair from the mane is softer while hair from the tail is quite stiff and wiry. Different types of fiber will be woven in combination with the wool and or cotton to produce various grades of canvas and haircloth which are used in combination to build the foundational structure of a coat.

In the photo below, from left to right, are haircloth, which has a lot of roll due to the horsetail strands, wrapped hair cloth which is softer and less expensive than haircloth, wool canvas, and the black item is fusible.

canvassed suit vs fused suit

From left to right: haircloth, wrapped haircloth, wool canvas, fusible.

The wool canvas forms that main foundational layer of the coat, then smaller pieces of haircloth or wrapped hair are used to build structure to the chest and shoulder, and these are covered by a piece of felt, domette or flannel to prevent the hair, which is wiry, from scratching the wearer. Sometimes the horse hair will poke through the layers, sometimes protruding out of the garment; this is an annoyance more than anything and can either be snipped away or pulled through.


 

FULL CANVAS GARMENTS

 

canvassed suit difference fused jacket full canvas

what is canvas suit

A garment which has a canvas structure running all the way from the top of the shoulder to the hem is known as a “full canvas garment”. It is very easy to determine whether a coat is fully-canvassed- take hold of the lower front of the coat and peel the two layers of wool (the front and the facing) apart- if you can feel a third layer floating between the two, that is the canvas. There were instructions floating around for a pinch test in which you pinch the chest and pinch the sleeve, but for reasons which you will soon see, this is not a reliable indicator.

Fashion has skewed toward lighter, finer, and more delicate cloth weights (a trend that I see starting to reverse itself) and these fine cloths can be very difficult to handle in construction, and be very sensitive to humidity. The Japanese, whose weather drove the march toward lighter cloths but whose humidity was detrimental to those cloths, were champions of a fairly recent technique of “skin fusing” the front- a lightweight fusible would be applied to the front part of the coat to give it stability when basting the canvas to the front, and to help prevent puckering from humidity. Some western manufacturers have adopted the technique for problem cloths so it is entirely possible to come across a front which has soft fusible on it, despite it being also fully-canvassed. More on fusibles shortly.

Notice that the canvas covers the front, including the lapel- the canvas will be rolled and padstitched in the lapel, which gives a certain amount of bloom or roll to it, which can be seen in better garments.

PROS:

• Hair canvas gives a roll and support to the front that fusibles can not;
• Floating canvas will never delaminate (bubble).

CONS:

• Expensive in terms of both materials and labor required;
• Poorly-inserted or shrinking canvas will case the fronts to pucker which is extremely difficult and often impossible to fix on a finished garment.

[For more information, check out How Much Does a Quality Suit Cost?]


 

FULLY FUSED GARMENTS

 

fused suit

And now a word about fusibles.

Fusible interlinings have come a very long way over the last 40 years. A German company developed the technology whereas an interlining would have a special resin applied to it which, when heated, would melt, and if another piece of cloth was pressed very firmly against it while the resin was soft, a bond was formed and the interlining was fused (or glued) to the cloth. The early days were horrific because the resin which bonded the interlining to the front failed often, causing delamination, or that infamous “bubbling” along the front. The technology has advanced greatly and these days, delamination is very rare (which is why it’s not considered a problem to skin-fuse a full canvas garment). It can still occur, however, if the garment is improperly handled.

Once the interlining has been bonded in a special machine, care is taken to make sure that the area is never heated without simultaneously applying pressure; during construction irons and presses are used, but there is always pressure accompanying the heat. If we want to remove the interlining, however (because of a faulty application, for example), we apply a bit of steam which softens the resin’s bond, and makes it easy to peel the interlining away. Any time you subject your garment to steam without pressure you soften the bond, creating a risk of delamination, which is one of the reasons I warn people never to steam tailored clothing (there are others).

Fusible interlining (a much heavier version than the skin-fuse variety) replaces the main canvas portion of the understructure of the garment, then a chest piece made of canvas, haircloth and felt is affixed along the roll line of the lapel, and tacked into the armhole but is otherwise left floating (thus the moniker “floating chest piece”). This is a quick, easy, and inexpensive way to stabilize the front and requires no skill on the part of the operator.

PROS:

• Quick, easy, inexpensive.

CONS:

• Stiffens the cloth slightly, does not provide the same type of support that animal hair does;
• No canvas in the lapel so the lapel is somewhat flat and lifeless;
• Slight risk of delamination.


HALF CANVAS GARMENTS

hlf canvassed suit how to recognize
how to tell canvassed suit fused

Half-canvas garments are becoming more and more common as they combine the advantage of both methods– a cost-saving in terms of material and labor for the application, reduced risk of distortions on the lower fronts, but the benefits of canvas in the chest and lapel, where they are needed the most. The front is fused (something, whether canvas or fusible is required to stabilize the fronts), but the fusing does not extend into the lapel area. It used to be common for the canvas to extend below the pocket, or at least to the second button, but most manufacturers now only extend it to the first button. Since there is no canvas in the lower portion, you can’t use the pinch test to determine whether a garment is half-canvas or not. When canvases were heavier you could feel down the front of the coat and sometimes tell where the canvas ended but many are using softer, lighter canvas now which is harder to detect. On finer wools, you could look for dimples under the lapel which would suggest pad-stitching, but this will be invisible on more robust cloth. In fact, the only way to know for sure is to ask a well-informed salesperson (not all salespersons are well-informed). (There are variants on the half-canvas method but for simplicity, I will consider them all the same)

PROS:

Less expensive than full-canvas, less sensitive to humidity, good lapel roll.

CONS:

Stiffens the cloth slightly, slight risk of delamination.

While purists will insist that only full canvas garments should ever be considered, there is a significant cost involved and so it is a little disingenuous to insist, particularly to newbs, that fused or half-canvas garments should be avoided outright. Someone who is just starting out his career will likely not have the means for full canvas, nor is he likely to be familiar enough with suiting in general to risk purchasing something off the internet in order to get a good deal.

[Check out this article to explore full canvas garments that won’t break the bank]

Half-canvas is a more affordable alternative, and if he is really on a budget, a fused garment makes an inexpensive first step; considering how our tastes and preferences evolve once we have been wearing and trying on suits for a while, it is perhaps wise to start off with a less expensive purchase and work up to the better makes once we have a better fix on our tastes and what fits and suits us.

Addendum

A padded lapel refers to the fact that there is a separate layer of canvas which has been gradually rolled while stitching the canvas layer to the cloth, giving this result

full canvas canvassed suit pinch lapel

A flat-fused lapel will roll a little bit, but never as much as a padded canvas lapel- compare the limp, black stuff in the photo above (fusible) to the canvas next to it.

Hoffman Watches – Racing 40 and Diver 40 REVIEW

By Nathan Flowers

These days, it feels like most watchmakers are following the “bigger is better” theme, with both divers and chronographs seeming to start at 42mm, and getting larger from there. With that in mind, newcomer Hoffman Watches is bucking the trend by introducing two 40mm models, which they have been kind enough to loan us for this review.

hoffman watches review

Their Racing 40 model is very handsome and feels solid, but not heavy. It has a 316L stainless case that is polished on the sides, and lugs that are machined satin on the front/back. The black leather strap measures 20mm wide, and has a machined stainless buckle. It fits well on my 7” wrist– not too large, and not too small. The Racing 40 echoes a Daytona or Speedmaster in both looks and proportions.

hoffman watches kickstarter

That said, it is handsome in its own right, and our test model stands out with a reverse panda dial in a lighter navy blue background with white under the sub-registers for the chronograph minutes and 24-hour time. Under an AR-coated sapphire crystal, hour indexes are noted by very precise dots of hand-applied lume that give off a greenish Seiko-like glow. This lume is also applied to the high-polished hour and minute hands.

hoffman watches diver

The chronograph is easy to use, and sweeps at 5 beats per second, faster than a typical quartz second hand. The pushers feel nice and mechanical, and the chronograph instantly resets to zero when you hit the bottom pusher. It’s powered by a Seiko VK64 movement, so you know it’s going to be accurate (and it has been during my testing.) Though Hoffman also offers a mechanical chronograph movement (Seagull TY2901) for an additional $199.

Water resistance is a standard 50M, though since it’s sporting a leather strap with a lizard pattern, it wouldn’t be your first choice to take on your fishing boat. However, it would be right at home when going out for beers with jeans and a button-down, or maybe a blazer in the evening. It’s a bit too much of a tool watch for me to wear with a suit, though as a forum admin and IT nerd, my suit-wearing occasions are sadly lacking these days.

hoffman watches price

Let me get this out of the way now. I am a sucker for diving watches. I dive several times a year and always take 2-3 watches out with me if I’m going to be diving for more than a few days. I also religiously visit Styleforum’s Poor Man’s Watch Thread, and consequently, I own too many Seiko/Citizen divers, like the SKX and the SRP-reissues. The Hoffman Diver 40 is right up my alley.

hoffman watches affordable sports watches

Our review model is really striking, mainly because of how understated it is– black case riding a black NATO with a black bezel and a black dial. This thing is a Stealth Diver on your wrist. The hands and the indexes both are coated in a blue-tinted Super-LumiNova that glows well for hours after charging with light. The quartz movement is silent to my ear, and Hoffman also offers an automatic option for $99. Both offer 100M water resistance, which is more than enough for most diving.

hoffman watches styleforum

The uni-directional bezel rotates smoothly, but with a solidity that you don’t regularly see on watches below $1000. Each click passes with a gentle yet firm snap. On the review model, the bezel is marked with black indexes, and arabic numerals at the 15, 30, and 45 minute spots. The zero index is the source of my only qualm with the Diver 40– it’s a glossy black diamond that doesn’t contain any lume, making it less likely to be seen well in deeper or murky water. This fits in with the darker style of our review model, so it’s definitely a stylistic choice. Hoffman also does have models with a white zero index, which I feel would be more suitable for diving. On land, the Diver 40 definitely wears well on the wrist, feeling less bulky and having a lower profile than your typical SKX/SRP.  It draws the eye without being obnoxious.

hoffman watches color options kickstarter

Hoffman Watches’ Affiliate Thread shows many color combinations to choose from (I’m seriously considering a rose gold navy diver for myself), and with a shockingly low Kickstarter 24-hour super early bird pre-order price of $169 for the Hoffman Watches quartz models, you are getting a lot of watch for the money. Frankly, both of these watches feel like they’re worth much more than you’re paying for, and even at their ultimate retail price of $425, I think you’re getting a great piece of kit at a good price.


This is not sponsored content. To read Styleforum’s review policy, please click here.

Pitti Uomo 94: The Best Outfits

Pitti Uomo 94 didn’t disappoint: slim fit suits are (finally) disappearing in favor of roomier fits and lots of pleating. Many people ditched sport coats and chose to wear field jackets, a solid #menswear trend in 2018. Aloha shirts were a hit as well, and the pairing with tailored clothing, albeit bold, looks surprisingly sharp. Are you going to be rocking this look this summer?

For the time being, enjoy a selection of the best outfits spotted at Pitti Uomo 94, captured by the lens of our talented photographer @sebastianmcfox.

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit menswear

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men menswear

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men photo pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men trends pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men moda maschile pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men florence pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men firenze

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle suit best outfit men look

We would like to thank our correspondents from Pitti Uomo, @sebastianmcfox and @stingwersen (owner of @vecchioanseatico).

Check out the complete streetswear galleries of Pitti Uomo 94 Day 1,  Day 2, and  Day 3 & 4.

Join the conversation on the Pitti Uomo 94 thread on the forum.

Pitti Uomo 94 Streetstyle – Day 3 & 4

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle florence suits menswear

Pitti Uomo Streetstyle 94 – DAY 3 & 4

Pitti Uomo 94 is coming to an end; these are some streetstyle pictures of the best outfits spotted in Florence during day 3 & 4 of the fair.

To comment the outfits, head over to the Pitti Uomo 94 thread on Styleforum.

If you’re in Florence, take a look at our guide to menswear shopping in town here.

All photos by @sebastianmcfox

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Pitti Uomo 94 Streetstyle – DAY 2

pitti uomo 94 streetstyle best style photography suit

Floral patterns and aloha shirts are a big hit this season.

Pitti Uomo Streetstyle 94 – DAY 2

Here are some Pitti Uomo streetstyle pictures of the best outfits spotted outside of the Fortezza da Basso – as well as at some cool events hosted by brands and makers in Florence.

To comment the outfits, head over to the Pitti Uomo 94 thread on Styleforum.

If you’re in Florence, take a look at our guide to menswear shopping in town here.

All photos by @sebastianmcfox

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Best Menswear Stores for Shopping in Florence during Pitti Uomo

By Cristina Ferro

Florence is the city where the Italian fashion system was founded. In Florence you can find a world made of highly skilled artisans and their expertise: In fact, its history and traditions made it possible to create the perfect network for an emerging fashion market.
Florence is still a great place for menswear shopping. We have great boutiques and workshops where tradition is at its best. Here’s a selection of menswear boutiques for menswear shopping to visit during Pitti Uomo:

Eredi Chiarini

Let’s start with the most iconic and famous boutique: Eredi Chiarini is a must-visit place for menswear shopping in Florence. As far as I can remember, It’s always been a landmark for gentlemen as well as for young professionals. I remember our dad and older brothers used to buy their garments from Eredi Chiarini when I was a little girl in the 80’s!
This amazing clothing store opened in 1970; shortly after, they began to manufacture jackets, pants, shirts, and suits in line with the style of Italian and British accessories such as ties, bags, umbrellas, hats and shoes that they carry in store.
You can get your tailored garments done at Eredi Chiarini, as they collaborate with the most prestigious Italian tailors and offer a great selection of fabrics.

Address: Via Porta Rossa 33/R Firenze

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tie Your Tie

Many of you may be familiar with Franco Minucci. He started working in menswear as an agent for some of the most important brands in the early 80’s. Through the years, he developed a personal fashion aesthetic that came to fulfillment with the opening of his own menswear shop, which offers the highest quality merchandise, in 1984.
After Mr. Franco Minucci founded the Tie your Tie Shop in Florence, he established its factory of marvelous artisanal ties. His inspiration for the shop comes from the concept of “beauty and simplicity”, and his values can be found in the details of these gorgeous creations, as well as in the highest quality items selected for his menswear boutique.
Ties are definitely the key player here, especially the “Sette Pieghe”, the original sevenfold ties.
Mr. Minucci says that the inspiration for the Sette Pieghe comes from the colors and designs from mid 19th century fashion. The Sette Pieghe ties were a great success as soon as they were released and still are made by hand using fine cloths provided by world-famous suppliers.

Address: Piazza de’ Rucellai 8r Firenze


Liverano & Liverano

Liverano & Liverano is one of the most important tailoring houses in Florence, as well as one of the few remaining from an era where dressing well was not considered a flair, but rather a requirement for any respectable man. The Liverano brothers’ business started at the end of the 1960’s in Florence, in Santa Maria Novella. Twenty years later, they moved the business to Via de’ Fossi, where it is still located today.
It’s not uncommon to walk inside and find Antonio Liverano in the house, at work at the cutting table. This is what made him one of the most respectful and admired personalities in the modern Florentine tailoring scene.
The Florentine tailoring style is all about slightly extended, soft, and generous shoulder, short jacket bottom, wide chest, low positioned pocket to create a V-shaped jacket whose bottom borders are cut away. This is still Liverano’s signature style.
The Florentine tradition requires a three-button configuration, and in the tailoring house they always remind their clients of the golden rule: with a cutaway style, you need to close only the central button!
In Via de’ Fossi you will find tailors who have worked with Liverano for over 40 years as well as some young, equally skilled ones.

Address: Via de’ Fossi, 43 Firenze


Piero Puliti


Piero Puliti started his career in fashion in Florence, working in the trendiest menswear shops if the 1970’s. After a few years, he started his business as a fashion designer, creating his own prêt-a-porter collections.
Later on, his love for menswear brought him to open a shop of his own in the heart of downtown Florence, not far from the Duomo and Piazza Della Signoria. He still runs a small, marvelous boutique where his creations and his taste and style in decorating spaces are manifest to the visitors; in this small boutique, his vision and creations are crystal clear. Piero is known to be one of the best tiemakers in town.

Address: Via Del Corso 51/R Firenze


Dimitri Villoresi

The leather industry is one of the most important ones in Tuscany; we are very proud of our leather artisans, and some of them stand out for being of a kind in terms of quality and style. Dimitri Villoresi is one of those.
Dimitri runs his workshop in Oltrarno, where he personally stitches his creations. Dimitri’s workshop, DV Bags, is a charming place that is hidden away from the main touristic areas and guided tours.
Dimitri Villoresi can be considered a visionary poet and an artist. He is one of the pioneers in the movement that looks back to true craftsmanship: he only uses the traditional tools of a by-gone era, and none of his creations ever see a sewing machine. His instruments are the cobblers’ knives, awls, scissors, needles, and thread.

The Dimitri Villoresi workshop is also a training center: here, the old art of leatherworking is passed on to the new generations through individual, personalized courses.

My favorite bag is La Sporta, a traditional “shopping bag” suitable for daily use. As Dimitri says, “it is an open container where you just put your things straight in and they stay there”. Such a pure and essential design for men and women alike!

Address: Via dell’Ardiglione 22 Firenze


Marina Calamai

Here’s another designer from team Oltrarno! Marina is an artist who runs a beautiful studio in Oltrarno, in Palazzo Guicciardini, in the heart of the coolest district in Florence. Her handiwork focuses mainly on painting and the creation of amazing pieces of furniture and homeware objects. Through the years, she has taken inspirations from the most diverse fields: food, science, and nature.
Marina also is a skilled goldsmith. If you get to know her, you’ll love her jewelry. And her men’s collections are just as inspiring and creative as the rest of the items you’ll see visiting her atelier.
Her cufflinks remind me of a shackle (perfect for sailing lovers!), physics and its formulas (Quantum teleportation formula), the shape of Santo Spirito church, Nautilus fossils, champagne corks, musical notes (specifically the Chroma), and finally the latest creation: the Bond-inspired shape of a Martini cocktail.
You should visit her studio and experience this connection between fashion, arts, and science!

Address: Via Santo Spirito, 14 Firenze

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Bernardo

If you lived in Florence and you were looking for high quality, timeless, and classic pieces for your wardrobe, you would likely be a regular customer of Bernardo’s, and an acquaintance of Andrea, the owner. I know more than a man who has made of this tiny menswear boutique their #1 choice when it comes to menswear shopping.
Bernardo is a small, charming boutique in Via Porta Rossa, exquisitely piled in 23 square meters or less. In such a tiny space, they manage to carry so many great clothes! The store has existed for over thirty years and it’s known for the excellent selection of brands and the great customer service: clients are cared of and advised by Andrea and his employees.
Bernardo also offers an excellent custom-made tailoring service. Indeed, the most peculiar trait of this boutique is the precision they have when helping a client. This is why gentlemen in Florence have always considered it one of the best places for menswear finds and true Made-in-Italy classic pieces.

Address: Via Porta Rossa 87/r Firenze

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tacs Casentino

Not far from Bernardo, walking through the streets around via Tornabuoni (the luxury goods shopping street in Florence) you might take a turn and find yourself in a totally different universe. It’s a colorful place that reminds me of wildlife, history, and traditions: it’s the world of TACS Casentino.
You may know that Casentino is a valley located in Eastern Tuscany north of Arezzo. It is famous for its naturalistic beauty, wild forests, Etruscan sites, Romanesque churches, and Medieval castles, as well as for the traditional fabric that takes its name.
The production of the panno casentino started in the mid 19th century, and with time, its manufacturers developed the techniques to give the Casentino fabric its peculiar characteristics: the traditional ricciolo (curl), and the soft hand with an irregular surface.
Originally, Casentino fabric was often dyed in colors we wouldn’t expect to see today; the most typical color was a very bold red. Today, we all know its most iconic colors are bright orange and green, but maybe not everyone knows that these tones were the result of a mistake occurred in the dyeing process!
In this small boutique, you will find every model and color of coats and accessories in Casentino, as well as collections in fustian and cashmere.

Address: Borgo Santi Apostoli 43 R Firenze

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Cristina Ferro is an image consultant based in Florence, Italy. You can visit her official website here.

MEMORIAL DAY 2018 MENSWEAR SALES LIST

Please note that coupon codes may change throughout the weekend and that we’ll do our best to keep updating them and adding new ones. If you’d like to share a sale that’s not on the list, you may do so in the comment section or on the Official Sales Thread on the forum.

Thank you and happy shopping!


Acrimony: Save 40% off discounted items. Use code: FAREWELL.

Allen Edmonds: up to 40% off on shoes, plus 30% off Woodlore.

Alternative Apparel – 40% off plus 20% off “brands we love” with code URFAMILY

American Trench: 20% off everything with code cookout.

Antonioli: Sales now on up to 50% off. More brands added: Calvin Klein, Off-White & more.

ASOS: 30% off occasionwear.

Baby & Co.: sale on now up to 40% off.

Backcountry: 30% off full price Arc’teryx.

Barneys: up to 40% off designer sale.

Barney’s Warehouse: Up to 85% Off Savings with an extra 50% off designer styles.

Beckett Simonon: any two pairs of shoes for $299 with code MEMORIAL.

Ben Sherman: 30% off with code HONOR.

Bergdorf Goodman: up to 40% off designer sale.

Bloomingdale’s: 20-40% off on regular price items and 40-50% off discounted items labeled “big brown sale”. Loyallists earn $50 every $200 spent.

Bluefly: up to 85% off, plus an additional 20% off on selected items.

Blue & Cream: Flash sale 20% EXTRA OFF sale with code EXTRA20.

Blue In Green: 25% off throughout the weekend.

Braun Hamburg: cashmere sale – 50% off.

Bodega: Use code EXTRA20 at checkout to save an additional 20% on sale items.

Bodileys: 30%off Mayfair and London collection with code BOD30.

Braun-Hamburg: CASHMERE SALE starts now! Summer cashmere reduced up to 50%.

Brooks BrothersMen’s Non-Iron Shirts Mix & Match 4 for $199 (or up to $120 each); Ties 50% off 2 or more.

Burberry: mid-season sale happening now.

Cali Roots: 25% OFF SITEWIDE CALIROOTS 14th ANNIVERSARY DEAL use code BDAY.

Canoe Club: 25% off with MEMORIALDAY25.

Carmina: 20% off a selection with code 20OFFCARMINA and 10% everything with code MEMORIALDAY2018

Club Monaco:25% off any purchase with code WARMWELCOME.

Cobbler Union: drivers and loafers 15% off with code REMEMBER.

Cruvoir: $35 off for $250+ purchase with code CVMAY35; $100 off for $500+ purchase with code CVMAY100; $250 off for $1000+ purchase with code CVMAY250; $550 off for $2000+ purchase with code CVMAY550.

Cultizm: 20% off + free shipping with code 20now.

Dapper Classics: 20% off your entire order with code MW18.

Domestic Domestic: 30% off everything with the code MOON.

Dope Factory: up to 50% off spring collection.

East Dane: Up to 40% off just-added items.

eBay: 15% off orders of $50 or more via coupon code PMEMDAY

Epaulet: Save 30% to 60% for Memorial Day.

Ernest Alexander: 30% off sale items with code MEMORIALDAY.

Farfetch: sale of up to 50% off.

Flannels: Up To 70% Off | The Outlet.

Forward: up to 50% off.

Frances May: Memorial Day sale now on 30% off a selection.

Gant: 20% off everything (automatic) or 30% off full-price at GANT w/code GNT30.

Gilt: 25% menswear and men’s accessories with code 25MAY.

Gitman: 20% off with code SUMMER18.

Golden Fox Footwear: Up to 70% off selected boots, no code required. Ends 05/29.

Great Divide: 20% off with code BANKHOLIDAY.

Franklin & Poe: 20% of everything with the code PARADE18.

Haven shop: Free shipping with code FLSHSHIP.

The Hill Side: 25% Off Everything with code MEMDAY.

Hotoveli: up to 50% off.

Huckberry: sale up to 70% off.

Hudson Sutler:  20% off on The Heritage Commuter Duffel with code DAD20.

Hunting Ensemble:

30% OFF Norse Projects, APC, Astorflex,Our Legacy, New Balance, Nanamica, The North Face and more (excl. sale) with code: VIPPRESALE.

Idol Brooklyn: Use code PRESALE30 at checkout for 30% off SS18 collections.

Independence: 50% off FW ’17 + Free shipping over $100.

Indocino: up to 60% off.

Jachs New York: MEMORIAL DAY SALE 50% OFF WITH CODE MDAY50.

J. Crew:  40% off your purchase including new collection with code GETAWAY.

John Elliott: S/S 18 Sale | Now Live.

Jonathon + Olivia: up to 50% off

Julian Fashion: Sale Season is started: Up to 40% Off.

Kith: sales on shoes and clothing.

Lanvin: Enjoy 50% off the Summer 2018 Collection and free shipping.

Last Call: up to 75% off everything.

LC King: 30% off with code Memorial18.

Levis: Memorial Day sale ongoing – use code MAY30 for 30% off.

L’Inde Le Palais: 50% off on SS18 collections.

LNN-CC: sale up to 40% off.

LOIT:  Sale Starts Now – 30% Off with code LOITMD18

LSG Denim: Sale – selvedge denim for 96.99 usd/125 cad with free shipping to US/Canada till June 9th.

Luisa Via Roma: up to 30% off SS18.

Luxeswap: 40% off shirts (min. 3) with code HOLYSHIRT; 75% off pants (min. 3) with code PANTPARTY; 35% off Ring Jackets with code RINGAROUNDTHEROSY; 50% off waistcoats with code WAISTNOTWANTNOT; 35% off Drake’s ties(min. 2) with code TIEONEON.

MAAS & Stacks: Enjoy a 25% discount on selected items after entering code: MEMORIAL18

Maison Margiela: up to 40% off* the SS18 Collection on the Maison Margiela online store.

Malford of London: 60% off everything plus extra 25% off with code SALE60.

Matches: sale on now for up to 50% off.

Miloh Shop: 20% Off All Denim with promo code “DENIM20“.

Mohawk: BEST OF SALE | 15% off for Memorial Day with code MEMORIAL15OFF.

Need Supply:  Sale! New markdowns up to 40% off.

Neiman Marcus: Up to 40% off designer sale.

Ne.Sense: SS18 Sale 20% Off.

Nitty Gritty: 25% Off on Selected Footwear | A.P.C. Resort Fall Collection.

No Man Walks Alone: 80% off Private Archive Sale.

Nordstrom:  Save up to 40% during Half-Yearly Sale

Nordstrom Rack: extra 25% off clearance items.

Notre-Shop: Additional Markdowns Up to 70% Off.

Nowell’s: 25% off with code MEM25.

Oak Street Bootmakers: $50 off all footwear.

Opening Ceremony: Take an Extra 20% Off All Sale Styles with code OCEXTRA20.

Other Shop: Use code ROYAL25 to take 25% off your order.

Pact Underwear: 20% off $100, 30% off $200, 40% off $300 use code MYSAVINGS.

Popov Leather: 30% off a selection + free shipping with code FATHERSDAY.

Rag & Bone: New Markdowns: Up to 60% Off.

Ralph Lauren30% off select styles with code MEMDAY.

The Real Real: 20% off with code REAL + up to 70% off.

Todd Snyder: 30% off new styles + up to 70% off sale.

Renarts: 40% off all regularly priced apparel, 30% off all regularly priced footwear, up to 80% off clearance, additional 10% sale section with code MDW10.

Roden Gray: Take up to 40% off selected apparel accessories and footwear.

Rooney Shop: Memorial Day sale now ongoing up to 30% off.

Saks 5th Ave.: up to 40% off DESIGNER SALE.

Sartoriale: Memorial Day Storewide SALE – Up to 90% OFF MSRP – Spend More, Save More

Shoes.com: Memorial Day sale 30-75% off + take 25% off with code SPRING 25.

ShopStyle: up to 70% off.

SSense: sale up to 50% off.

StyleBop: extra 20% off all styles applied at checkout.

Tessabit: Up to 50% off sale.

Todd Snyder: 30% off new styles + up to 70% off sale.

Totokaelo: 40% off Maison Margiela, Rick Owens, Comme des Garçons, and more.

Tres Bien: up to 70% off.

Uncle Otis: 20% OFF NEW ARRIVALS with code FLASH20.

Unis: sale on Common Projects.

Union: 30% and 40% off a selection.

Unionmade: take 20% off everything with the code MEMORIAL20.

Uniqlo: Free shipping no minimum order + items added to sale.

Urban Outfitters: sale up to 50% off.

Vince: extra 25% off of sale with code MDAY25.

X of Pentacles: all pocket squares on sale + Styleforum users get 10% off with code SF10.

Yoox:  up to an extra 60% off.

Wrong Weather: SS18 sale up to 30% off

ZFACTORIE: 30-50% off some styles for Memorial Day.